The Unconditional Surrender of Germany from World War Two

What we will be covering on our Wikispace:
  • Germany's Unconditional Surrender/Soviets surrounding Berlin
  • Victory in Europe
  • Hitler's Suicide
  • Franklin Roosevelt's death
  • New President


Germany's Unconditional Surrender/Soviets Surrounding Berlin
The Allies wanted to defeat Germany so bad because they were upset about how unfair the Nazis were to the Jews, and because Germany was starting to take over some other countries, like Africa. By 1945, the Allies approached Germany from the Western and Eastern Fronts. They needed to corner Germany to defeat them. The Soviets had Berlin, Germany's capital, surrounded. This was called the Battle of Berlin. Two fronts attacked Berlin from the East and South, and it was one of the bloodiest battles in history. During the last wars, Germany was getting very desperate, and they were recruiting any boy over the age of thirteen years old. They hung anyone that would refuse to join the army. So, basically, you would die either way. At this point, Hitler was getting really scared because he knew that the Soviets were coming for him and he knew that when they found him, he would be executed and humiliated. So, on April 30, 1945, Adolf Hitler committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. The replacement successor was commander in chief of the German navy, Karl Dönitz. He decided that it would be better if Germany just surrendered. The approximate number of killed German civilians and soldiers is estimated to be about 325,000 people. The official unconditional military surrender of Germany from World War Two took place on May 8, 1945, in Berlin, signed by the Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, the Supreme Commander of the Red Army, and the German High Command. Germany's surrender marked the official end of the war in Europe.




Hitler's Death Announcement in 1945 on London Radio

Adolf Hitler Commits Suicide

On the sad day of April 29, 1945, Adolf Hitler committed suicide with the accompaniment of his mistress, Eva Braun, with a combination of cyanide and gunshot to the head. This was taken place in his bunker in Berlin, as the Battle of Berlin was rapidly coming to an end and the Soviets were surrounding his city. The allied armies came for Berlin, Germany's capital, in the first place because that was w
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Adolf Hitler in a traditional pose
here Adolf Hitler was to be found. Therefore, the advance to Berlin was a strategic advance specifically to target Hitler. The day b
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A portrait of Adolf Hitler
efore his death, Adolf Hitler signed a will, witnessed by Joseph Goebbels, Wilhelm Burgdorf, Martin Bormann, and Hans Krebs. In it, he wrote that he wished to marry his mistress, Eva Braun. He also blamed the entire World War II on the Jews, calling them, "the truly guilty party in this murderous struggle". Lastly, the German Nazi leader appoined a new cabinet for Germany to continue the war by all means, which proved not to be followed on May 8, that same year.








President Franklin D. Roosevelt (video of his funeral)

President Franklin D. Roosevelt was the only president ever in history to be elected to four terms in office. During his third term of presidency, the United States was affected by the bombing at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, by Japanese forces in World War II. At this point, Roosevelt assumed the role of commander in chief of the U.S. military. During this role, FDR met numerous times with Churchill and Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin, to discuss war strategies. In 1944, President Roosevelt was elected again for his fourth term in office. This time though, his health was slowly deteriorating, and some say it impaired his judgement. Since then, he has been countlessly blamed for allowing Stalin to control Eastern
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FDR in a wheelchair during his fourth term of presidency
Europe after 1945, although there was not very much he could do about it. Sadly, Franklin died while on vacation during his fourth term in Warm Springs, Georgia, on April 11, 1945 from a massive brain hemorrhage. So, he unfortunately did not get to see the successful results of the United States after the war was concluded.










President Harry S. Truman (video of Truman warning Japan to surrender from WWII)
After thirty-second President Roosevelt's death, Harry S. Truman was put into office as the next president of the United States of America. At the time of his first term, World War II was still going on, but it was nearly over. When he was elected, he supported the vast majority of Roosevelt's political beliefs. Although Germany surrendered from the war on May 7, 1945, the war within Japan and the allied forces continued. From July 7, 1945, to August 2, 1945, Truman met with British premier
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President Harry S. Truman
Clement Attlee and Joseph Stal
in to discuss the effects of World War II on the world after it ended. In attempt to end the war faster, President Harry validated the use of the atomic bomb in Japan. This proved to be consequential when the bombing on Hiroshima and Nagasaki occurred only four days after the authorization was passed. But, on September 2, Japan surrendered from the war, based off of Truman's attempts.








Multiple Choice:

Why did Germany surrender from the war?
A. Their leader, Hitler, committed suicide
B. They were running out of soldiers and getting desperate
C. Karl Dönitz was forcing them to
D. All of the above


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